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Ilford Ilfotec DD-X Black and White Film Developer 1 Litre

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I generally use the manufacturer’s recommendations for film and paper processing, except for film development where I find the Ilford recommended development times rather long for my way of working. Perhaps the best part about using DD-X, is that it gives users the maximum amount of tonality on their negatives. That means that the negatives will look relatively flat when compared to other developers like Rodinal or pyro-based developers. But in return, you’ll get negatives that can be edited to create the desired level of contrast. In Semi-Stand Development (SSD), the approach is the same with one minor variation. Going with the Ilfosol 3 example above, I would do 2 x 30 minutes and stir 10 seconds initially and 10 seconds before the second 30-minute time slot. Nothing else changes. Why break it down into two slots instead of just letting it stand for 30 minutes? Depending on the chemistry I am using, I may want to enhance the effect of that chemistry slightly. So, the second stir at the midpoint works harder to produce the desired effect. Films developed to a slightly lower D max, and slightly lower gamma, with an extended straight line portion to the characteristic curve, tend to make life easier for scanning. As the digit work flow is optimised with out consideration of a toe or sholder, which do not exist in digital output from sensors. However I have successfully scanned Images that I took in the 50's using Adox R17 and processed in one shot Neofin blue, a very highly dilute Beutler type developer that gives great compensation, sharpness and high actuance. Adox R17 was a single coated high silver content thin emulsion, with massive resolution and extraordinary tonal rendition, When correctly processed. I was able to produce fine quality 3meter square bromide enlargements for store window displays, from Rollie negatives. These were able to stand up sufficiently well with others from 5x7 negatives.

Nikon F5 – AF Nikkor 35mm 1:2D – Adox HR-50 @ ASA-50 – Ilford Ilfotec DD-X (1+4) 7:30 @ 20C Nikon F5 – AF Nikkor 35mm 1:2D – Adox HR-50 @ ASA-50 – Ilford Ilfotec DD-X (1+4) 7:30 @ 20C Nikon F5 – AF Nikkor 35mm 1:2D – Adox HR-50 @ ASA-50 – Ilford Ilfotec DD-X (1+4) 7:30 @ 20C Nikon F5 – AF Nikkor 35mm 1:2D – Adox HR-50 @ ASA-50 – Ilford Ilfotec DD-X (1+4) 7:30 @ 20C I'm getting timings which vary between 13 minutes and 20.30 minutes, which is obviously a fairly vast gulf and not really much help... Minolta Maxxum 9 – Minolta Maxxum AF 28-135mm 1:4-4.5 – Ilford Delta 100 @ ASA-100 – Ilford DD-X (1+4) 10:30 @ 20C Minolta Maxxum 9 – Minolta Maxxum AF 28-135mm 1:4-4.5 – Ilford Delta 100 @ ASA-100 – Ilford DD-X (1+4) 10:30 @ 20C Minolta Maxxum 9 – Minolta Maxxum AF 28-135mm 1:4-4.5 – Ilford Delta 100 @ ASA-100 – Ilford DD-X (1+4) 10:30 @ 20C Minolta Maxxum 9 – Minolta Maxxum AF 28-135mm 1:4-4.5 – Ilford Delta 100 @ ASA-100 – Ilford DD-X (1+4) 10:30 @ 20C A single 1L bottle isn’t that expensive, but when you consider that it requires a 1+4 dilution, that means you’re only getting 10 cycles out of a single bottle. For example, Rodinal, which usually comes in a 500ml bottle at a cheaper price, can develop up to 50 rounds, totaling 100 rolls of 35mm film — all in a solution that doesn’t expire over time. That’s why I always recommend Rodinal (or Blazinal in Canad) to be the first film developer for new film photographers. is a "normal" ISO range for me at this time of year. It's often gloomy, and I walk in the woodland with "lighter" camera combos which usually means no more than f/2.8 to rely on.Here are my tested recipes for SSD, regardless of whether using 35mm or 120 medium formats . I prefer SSD over SD. YMMV. Experiment at your risk. I always use water at 68 F and a minimum of 5-6 ml of chemistry in all my recipes , even if the math says to use less . Again, I use 500 ml for either developing 1 120 rolls or 2×35 mm rolls and 1,000 ml for developing either 3×35 mm rolls or 2×120 rolls or 1×35 mm and 1×120 – all in the same tank. I spent the latter part of 2018 and all of 2019 with Rodinal, and I made the descision to spend 2020 with HC-110, but to be honest, after my first few rolls, I found it delivered far superior results to Rodinal for the films I shot and the look I liked. HP5 in Rodinal looks terrible to my eye so it's not included here.

But film developers all perform a little bit different. Some of them can make dramatic changes in the look of your images. DD-X is one of the most common, and most expensive developers on the market. Ilford Multigrade Fibre Based variable contrast papers. They provide a powerful creative tool. Having different levels of contrast in parts of the same print seems to create images with an extra dimension compared to single grade papers. Stop Bath While the grain structure doesn’t seem to be anymore prominent between the two diluted developers, I feel the HC-110B dilution added a little more grain making the photos sharper. I am not sure exactly how developers work, but it is my understanding that the more you dilute it, the more grain you get. Kodak HC-110B Ilfotec DD-XLike I said though, I am not versed in the particulars of how developers work, if you are, please let me know in the comments if dilution does make a difference in the amount of grain you get in your images.

I really like DD-X and plan on continuing to use it, but I can't offer much in the way of reasoning as to why it's better than anything else given that it's all I've ever used since I began home-developing in the spring. I have used Rodinal (in the form of Adox Adonal) on one roll of Fomapan 100, and I wasn't unhappy with the results, but I still prefer the way DD-X works on the same film. For everything else DD-X has produced results I'm very happy with - just as nice as the lab results I've had in XTol - and it's handled everything I've thrown at it with aplomb, including pushing HP5+ on and two stops (I also plan on shooting a roll at 3200asa at some point to see how that fares). Ilford DDX for single roll – 15 ml + 485 ml water – 22+22 with 20-second stir at start and midpoint.So interestingly, whilst I was developing the 2 test rolls I also had a roll of HP5 shot at 1600 to do. I decided to dev it in DD-X. Ilfotec DD-X is the best developer for developing B&W film that is ISO 400 and above. This liquid-concentrate developer enhances shadow details, and creates images with rich tonality, making it one of the top options for pushing film without creating overly-grainy images. Nikon FE – AI-S Nikkor 35mm 1:2.8 – Kodak TMax 100 @ ASA-100 – Ilford Ilfotec DD-X (1+4) 7:00 @ 20C Nikon FE – AI-S Nikkor 35mm 1:2.8 – Kodak TMax 100 @ ASA-100 – Ilford Ilfotec DD-X (1+4) 7:00 @ 20C Nikon FE – AI-S Nikkor 35mm 1:2.8 – Kodak TMax 100 @ ASA-100 – Ilford Ilfotec DD-X (1+4) 7:00 @ 20C Nikon FE – AI-S Nikkor 35mm 1:2.8 – Kodak TMax 100 @ ASA-100 – Ilford Ilfotec DD-X (1+4) 7:00 @ 20C

The solvent action in DD-X is fairly low compared to developers like HC-110, D-76, and ID-11, which can cause a noticeable reduction in image sharpness. It is more expensive on a roll-for-roll costing, but I've also found that it's cheaper to buy a bottle than the more economical developers. It's a false economy, but sometimes it works for the wallet that way. Certainly, the developer is not hampering my capability as a photographer as I perhaps suspected. It must be something else As you can see from the above DDX recipe, my cost per roll goes down with SSD. Now, I use 15 ml per roll or 25 ml per two rolls (or 12.5 ml per roll). I get 1,000ml / 25 = 80 rolls if I develop two at a time or 1,000 / 25 = 66 rolls if I develop one at a time compared to using 60ml per roll in normal development. This makes DDX quite affordable to use regularly.

Stop Bath

I’ve developed hundreds of rolls of film over the last couple of years, and DD-X has been by far my favorite developer for most of that time. The results that this solution gets are second to none with faster films, which is one of the major reasons why I almost always keep a bottle of it on my shelf to this day. Mamiya m645 – Mamiya-Sekor C 1:2.8 f=80mm – Kodak TMax 400 @ ASA-400 – Ilford Ilfotec DD-X (1+4) 8:00 @ 20C Mamiya m645 – Mamiya-Sekor C 1:2.8 f=80mm – Kodak TMax 400 @ ASA-400 – Ilford Ilfotec DD-X (1+4) 8:00 @ 20C Mamiya m645 – Mamiya-Sekor C 1:2.8 f=80mm – Kodak TMax 400 @ ASA-400 – Ilford Ilfotec DD-X (1+4) 8:00 @ 20C Mamiya m645 – Mamiya-Sekor C 1:2.8 f=80mm – Kodak TMax 400 @ ASA-400 – Ilford Ilfotec DD-X (1+4) 8:00 @ 20C Each person coming up with the recipe for SD has their preferred time. So, for example, in the case of Ilfosol 3, while developing Ilford Delta 100, where one would normally use 1+9 for 5 minutes – 33 ml + 267 ml water while following normal developing instructions, the same film could be developed by using 1 + 50 for 60 minutes – 6ml + 294 ml water in SD. Note that when developing 120, I always use 500 ml total, including the chemistry. The 500 ml also develops 2x35mm rolls. So, I use 6 ml + 494 ml water. You would pour the chemistry into the developing tank, stir for 20 seconds, and then leave it alone for 60 minutes. Again, that is my recipe. You can Google ‘Ilfosol 3 stand developing recipe’ to see what others have discovered. The net result of doing SD is that instead of using 33ml for each roll, I can use 6ml and get 5-10x (depending on how many 35mm and 120 rolls I am developing) more rolls per bottle of Ilfosol 3.

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