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A Keeper: The Sunday Times Bestseller

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The snarky ex-husband didn't go over well either and actually just disappeared out of the end of the story, never to be heard from again. We know from the first page (the chapter known as "Before") that a POV character is in great distress after some type of turbulent event in which an official vehicle has arrived.

It’s a sad and lovely book, brimful of tenderness and compassion, where the revelations of the past upturn the perceptions of the present. The 103 third parties who use cookies on this service do so for their purposes of displaying and measuring personalized ads, generating audience insights, and developing and improving products. Finance is provided by PayPal Credit (a trading name of PayPal UK Ltd, Whittaker House, Whittaker Avenue, Richmond-Upon-Thames, Surrey, United Kingdom, TW9 1EH). The POVs between Patricia and Elizabeth and the mini POVs for Edward and Rosemary just didn't hang together well.Whilst I expected Elizabeth’s discovery of her origins to be revelatory and of momentous importance to her the fairly muted, and abrupt ending, proved a bit of a damp squib. Compelling, well-written with a great eye for human foibles it is undoubtedly highly readable but for me lacked substance and there isn’t much more to the novel than what becomes pretty obvious early on. Most purchases from business sellers are protected by the Consumer Contract Regulations 2013 which give you the right to cancel the purchase within 14 days after the day you receive the item.

While I certainly understood Elizabeth's quest for information, I felt she was a fairly impulsive character. To calculate the overall star rating and percentage breakdown by star, we don’t use a simple average. Graham Norton has won 9 BAFTAs for Best Entertainment Performance, and Best Entertainment Programme.

This book is nothing like his first book ( ) which I also loved but it has some similar themes; small town Ireland, dark humour, real life. In the wardrobe she finds a box with some letters that appear to be written by her father, a man whom she has never known, who she believes passed away when she was but an infant.

Norton cleverly mirrors the process of grieving in Patricia and Elizabeth’s stories, as the two women each mourn the passing of their mother. I love Graham Norton's writing and I would have read it in one sitting if I could, but I needed some sleep in between. We certainly didn't see it coming and when it arrives it will knock the chair right out from under you. The two treads of the story, current and historical , presented in parallel are an easy read and except for one element the plot is totally acceptable: where are Mary's relatives?

While it took Margaret Mitchell 10 years to compose 'Gone With the Wind', and 12 years for Victor Hugo to finish 'Les Miserables', Graham Norton appears to have thrown this together over the course of a rainy Saturday afternoon and published it the following Monday without any further thought or attention. years earlier, a young woman stumbles from a remote stone house, the night quiet but for the tireless wind that circles her as she hurries further into the darkness away from the cliffs and the sea. She's a single mother raising her 17 year old son and dealing with the fall out of her marriage still. I've read a previous book by Graham Norton, - 'Holding' - and enjoyed it, which is why I wanted to pick this one up too.

Urged on by a friend she answers a lonely hearts ad in the Farmers’ Journal and meets Edward Foley, a taciturn farmer who lives in an isolated cottage with his domineering mother. Overall however I was just a little bemused by the abrupt conclusion and the takeaway felt a little too simplistic. We then begin to discover something of the life of Patricia, Elizabeth’s mother, partly through a bunch of letters but also as a witness to incidents in Patricia’s life. She receives a reply from one Edward Foley of Castle House, and what unfolds reminded me often of Stephen King’s ‘Misery’ - without the gore. If I have one minor criticism, it is to suggest to the author that, if he happens to have any American characters in future books, he might want to run the dialogue past an American to see if those are words we would actually say.

This novel will never be nominated for grand literary prizes, but I believe it makes an enjoyable read for those who like a good story with twists and turns. As she clears out her mother’s personal effects, she discovers a bundle of letters that appear to be from the father she has never known. By using the Web site, you confirm that you have read, understood, and agreed to be bound by the Terms and Conditions. The plot is quite far-fetched to begin with, but there are some sizeable holes in it, such as when characters do something completely out of character, or when information is revealed that makes something from earlier stop making sense, and then it's never explained (did we ever find out why Patricia owned the house, despite Edward still being alive? Graham Norton’s 2016 debut novel, Holding, surprised critics with its empathy, delicate characterisation and strong plotting.

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