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Heretics Of Dune: The Fifth Dune Novel: The inspiration for the blockbuster film

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He tries to assassinate Taraza but Odrade convinces him that the Sisterhood shares the religious beliefs of the Bene Tleilax. And still, the march of the Atreides family through history continues on, and the mankind continues to advance along along Leto II's "Golden Path," the enigmatic course of action by which he has safeguarded mankind from ultimate catastrophe and, thus, extinction. This is a concept as old as stories themselves, so why do so many authors these days have trouble identifying to the readers who their book is about and why we should care about them?

The plot of this book, frankly makes no sense, it goes through several reversals, keeps the readers completely in the dark on the motivation and reasons behind generally everything going on, and skips over serveral key scenes without even referencing them or what went on during them.But at a certain point, Sheeana’s story seems to drop by the wayside, after which her character is rarely seen. While Herbert’s Dune books have a reputation for getting weirder as they go along, the big revelations about the Honored Matres’ plans and the powers of the ghola are frankly laughable. The Atreides are still about, but have been absorbed into the Bene Gesserit Sisterhood, on which this book focuses. A young girl has an older man force himself on her and it's horrible and unthinkable, the same thing happens to a boy with an older woman and everyone is like, "good for him.

If you want to keep following Frank Herbert on the ride through his crazy Dune universe and see the impact of the Atreides on the human race then this is a required volume; on the other hand if you were happy to leave things where they were at the end of Children of Dune, or found the politics and world of God Emperor of Dune confounding then perhaps you should leave this one on the shelf.The Honored Matres attack Rakis, destroying the planet and the sandworms — except for the one the Bene Gesserit escape with. What we actually get are occasional bursts of violence punctuating the usual lengthy sections focused on scheming, strategising and portentous sociology.

The opening sentence of ‘Heretics’ is one of the most arresting in the entire sequence to date: “Taraza told you, did she not, that we have gone through eleven of these Duncan Idaho gholas? An attack is then made on Sheeana on Rakis, which is prevented by the intervention of the Bene Gesserit. The goal, I assume, is to produce the spice melange under the direct control of the sisterhood, as well as to dilute “the collective consciousness of the God Emperor … into just one sandworm, freeing humanity from the shadow of his prescience forever”, as Wikipedia puts it. People stop caring if anything is going to happen next, because they've seen that it isn't going to. Referencing the precise number of Duncan gholas to date (the character played by Jason Momoa in the 2021 adaptation of ‘Dune: Part One’ by Denis Villeneuve, for visual reference) is a neat trick of Herbert to indicate the considerable passage of time that has passed since the events of ‘God Emperor’.

An effort is made to develop characters properly - admittedly limited to a handful of childhood details, the occasional noting of a character's personal preferences, and the odd musing on the nature of love, but this is uncharted ground for the Dune series, where characters are usually far too busy planning the future of humanity to darn their own socks. Heretics takes place several thousand years after the events of God Emperor, offering Herbert the chance to clear the decks. Being vague is not bad in and of itself, you can build up mysteries in your stories to ratchet up the suspense and keep the readers interested. Herbert uses a very entertaining science fiction story as a vehicle to examine and explore politics, religion, economics, sociology, myth and military science.

Be warned: there are some spoilerific details for previous volumes of the original Dune series below. The human kind has scattered into space we are made to see- but we are not shown what it really means, but rather as readers we are invited to ask some questions ourselves. Brian describes the leading role of women in these novels as in some sense a tribute by Frank Herbert to his wife Beverly, who was suffering from cancer while he was writing Heretics.This has by far been on of my favorite books in the series thus far, and I’m curious as to why these last few books get so much hate.

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